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TheScientificWorldJOURNAL
Volume 7 (2007), Pages 240-246
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/tsw.2007.42
Short Communication

Impacts of Elevated Atmospheric CO2 and O3 on Paper Birch (Betula papyrifera): Reproductive Fitness

1Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI, USA
2USDA Forest Service, North Central Research Station, Rhinelander, WI, USA
3University of Joensuu, Kuopio, Finland
4Finnish Forest Research Institute, Suonenjoki, Finland

Received 27 September 2006; Revised 5 January 2007; Accepted 9 January 2007

Academic Editor: Andrzej Bytnerowicz

Copyright © 2007 Joseph N. T. Darbah et al.

Citations to this Article [11 citations]

The following is the list of published articles that have cited the current article.

  • Hilary S. Callahan, Katrina Del Fierro, Angelica E. Patterson, and Hina Zafar, “Impacts of elevated nitrogen inputs on oak reproductive and seed ecology,” Global Change Biology, vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 285–293, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
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  • Joseph N. T. Darbah, Mark E. Kubiske, Neil Nelson, Elina Oksanen, Elina Vapaavuori, and David F. Kamosky, “Effects of decadal exposure to interacting elevated CO2 and/or O-3 on paper birch (Betula papyrifera) reproduction,” Environmental Pollution, vol. 155, no. 3, pp. 446–452, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
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