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TheScientificWorldJOURNAL
Volume 9 (2009), Pages 424-430
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/tsw.2009.58
Research Article

Anthropometric Indices of Obesity and the Prediction of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in an Iranian Population

1Department of Biochemistry and Nutrition, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences (MUMS), Mashhad, Islamic Republic of Iran
2Cardiovascular Research Center, Avicenna Research Institute, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences (MUMS), Mashhad, Islamic Republic of Iran
3Community Health and Statistic Department, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences (MUMS), Mashhad, Islamic Republic of Iran
4Pharmacutical Research Center, Avicenna Research Institute, Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences (MUMS), Mashhad, Islamic Republic of Iran
5Postgraduate Medical School, University of Surrey, Stag Hill, Uk

Received 4 April 2009; Revised 23 May 2009; Accepted 27 May 2009

Academic Editor: Peter Little

Copyright © 2009 Mohsen Azimi Nezhad et al.

Abstract

The prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and metabolic syndrome are increasing globally. The present study was conducted in an attempt to define optimal cutoff values for several anthropometric variables in an Iranian population, as these may vary with ethnicity. Iranian subjects (2483 men and 2445 women), aged 15–65 years, were recruited using a cluster-stratified sampling method from rural and urban areas within the Khorasan province. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis was used to define optimal anthropometric cutoff values. The prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and metabolic syndrome were 28, 5.5, 67, and 39.9%, respectively. The gender-specific cutoff values for waist:height ratio to predict hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and metabolic syndrome among men were 0.52 (sensitivity = 66%; specificity = 66%), 0.54 (sensitivity = 65%; specificity = 65%), 0.50 (sensitivity = 58%; specificity = 57%), and 0.53 (sensitivity = 73%; specificity = 70%), and for women were 0.59 (sensitivity = 61%; specificity = 61%), 0.61 (sensitivity = 64%; specificity = 64%), 0.57 (sensitivity = 61%; specificity = 61%), and 0.59 (sensitivity = 77%; specificity = 77%) (p < 0.05). Significant correlations were found between waist:height ratio and hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and metabolic syndrome, particularly in women. Waist circumference cutoffs were higher for women than men for hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia.