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TheScientificWorldJOURNAL
Volume 11 (2011), Pages 1749-1761
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2011/289182
Review Article

Protein Disulfide Isomerase and Host-Pathogen Interaction

1Department of Parasitology, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil
2Cardiovascular Division, British Heart Foundation Centre, King's College London, 125 Coldharbour Lane, London SE5 9NU, UK
3Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil
4Department of Parasitology, School of Medicine of Jundiaí, São Paulo, SP, Brazil
5School of Medicine and Tropical Medicine Institute, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil
6Vascular Biology Laboratory, Heart Institute (InCor), São Paulo, Brazil

Received 3 June 2011; Accepted 7 September 2011

Academic Editor: Mauro Perretti

Copyright © 2011 Beatriz S. Stolf et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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