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TheScientificWorldJOURNAL
Volume 11, Pages 1829-1841
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2011/736480
Review Article

The Three-Layer Concentric Model of Glioblastoma: Cancer Stem Cells, Microenvironmental Regulation, and Therapeutic Implications

1Oncohematology Laboratory, Department of Paediatrics, University of Padova, Via Giustiniani 3, Padova 35128, Italy
2Neurosurgery, Department of Neuroscience, University of Padova, Via Giustiniani 2, Padova 35128, Italy

Received 28 July 2011; Accepted 29 September 2011

Academic Editor: Martin Gotte

Copyright © 2011 Luca Persano et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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