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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2012, Article ID 165067, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/165067
Research Article

Amazon Rainforest Exchange of Carbon and Subcanopy Air Flow: Manaus LBA Site—A Complex Terrain Condition

1Universidade do Estado do Amazonas, Manaus, AM, Brazil
2State University of New York, Albany, NY, USA
3Universidade de São Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil

Received 11 October 2011; Accepted 14 November 2011

Academic Editors: J. Dodson and C. Ottle

Copyright © 2012 Julio Tóta et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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