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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 349842, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/349842
Research Article

Early Healing Events around Titanium Implant Devices with Different Surface Microtopography: A Pilot Study in an In Vivo Rabbit Model

1Department of Human Anatomical Sciences and Physiopathology of Locomotor Apparatus, Human Anatomy Section, University of Bologna, via Irnerio 48, 40126 Bologna, Italy
2Dental School, University of Brescia, Piazza Spedali Civili 1, 25123 Brescia, Italy
3Department of Veterinary Medical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Bologna, via Tolara di Sopra 50, 40064 Ozzano dell’Emilia, Bologna, Italy

Received 29 July 2011; Accepted 21 October 2011

Academic Editor: Margaret Tzaphlidou

Copyright © 2012 Ester Orsini et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

In the present pilot study, the authors morphologically investigated sandblasted, acid-etched surfaces (SLA) at very early experimental times. The tested devices were titanium plate-like implants with flattened wide lateral sides and jagged narrow sides. Because of these implant shape and placement site, the device gained a firm mechanical stability but the largest portion of the implant surface lacked direct contact with host bone and faced a wide peri-implant space rich in marrow tissue, intentionally created in order to study the interfacial interaction between metal surface and biological microenvironment. The insertion of titanium devices into the proximal tibia elicited a sequence of healing events. Newly formed bone proceeded through an early distance osteogenesis, common to both surfaces, and a delayed contact osteogenesis which seemed to follow different patterns at the two surfaces. In fact, SLA devices showed a more osteoconductive behavior retaining a less dense blood clot, which might be earlier and more easily replaced, and leading to a surface-conditioning layer which promotes osteogenic cell differentiation and appositional new bone deposition at the titanium surface. This model system is expected to provide a starting point for further investigations which clarify the early cellular and biomolecular events occurring at the metal surface.