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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2012, Article ID 372852, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/372852
Research Article

The Use of Parsimonious Questionnaires in Occupational Health Surveillance: Psychometric Properties of the Short Italian Version of the Effort/Reward Imbalance Questionnaire

1Institute of Occupational Medicine, The Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, 00168 Rome, Italy
2State Police Health Service Department, Ministry of the Interior, Italy
3Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology and Genetics, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa, Italy
4Department of Medical Sociology, University of Duesseldorf, 40225 Duesseldorf, Germany

Received 19 June 2012; Accepted 10 July 2012

Academic Editors: C. Fernandez-Llatas and O. Lazaro

Copyright © 2012 Nicola Magnavita et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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