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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2012, Article ID 498278, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/498278
Review Article

The Golgi in Cell Migration: Regulation by Signal Transduction and Its Implications for Cancer Cell Metastasis

1Department of Biology, University of Konstanz, Universitätsstrasse 10, 78457 Konstanz, Germany
2Biotechnology Institute Thurgau, Unterseestrasse 47, 8280 Kreuzlingen, Switzerland

Received 20 November 2011; Accepted 18 December 2011

Academic Editors: W. Bai, M. Chiariello, N. C. de Souza-Pinto, A. Dricu, and R. Hamamoto

Copyright © 2012 Valentina Millarte and Hesso Farhan. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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