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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 509838, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/509838
Research Article

Alfa-Lipoic Acid Controls Tumor Growth and Modulates Hepatic Redox State in Ehrlich-Ascites-Carcinoma-Bearing Mice

Zoology Department, Faculty of Science, Princess Nora Bint AbdulRahman University, Riyadh 11481, Saudi Arabia

Received 19 October 2011; Accepted 11 January 2012

Academic Editor: Chrisostomos Prodromou

Copyright © 2012 M. AL Abdan. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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