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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2012, Article ID 524607, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/524607
Research Article

A Survey on Prevalence and Pathological Findings of Gallstones in Lori-Bakhtiari Sheep in Iran

1Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14155-6453, Tehran, Iran
2Club of Young Researchers, Islamic Azad University, Shahrekord Branch, P.O. Box 166, Shahrekord, Iran
3Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Islamic Azad University, Shahrekord Branch, P.O. Box 166, Shahrekord, Iran
4Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Islamic Azad University, Shahrekord Branch, P.O. Box 166, Shahrekord, Iran

Received 14 October 2011; Accepted 14 December 2011

Academic Editor: Udeni B. R. Balasuriya

Copyright © 2012 Afshin Raoofi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

In a survey of 430 Lori-Bakhtiari sheep at a slaughterhouse in Iran, gallstones were found in the gallbladder of 7 sheep (1.6%). Biliary calculi were more frequent in adult and female sheep ( 𝑃 < 0 . 0 5 ). Chemical analysis of the gallstones revealed 6 sheep with pigment (bilirubin) stones and 1 sheep with cholesterol stones. Chemical composition of bile in these sheep was evaluated. Bacteriologic analysis of the bile in the affected sheep revealed bacteria (Streptococcus spp., Klebsiella spp., Escherichia coli, and Salmonella spp.) in 5 sheep. Microscopic examination of gallbladders revealed focal calcification, cystic glands, necrosis and atrophy of mucosal layer, edema, diffuse and focal infiltration of lymphocytes in submucosal layer, and hypertrophy of smooth muscles in sheep with gallstones. It was concluded that the prevalence of both types of gallstones in Lori-Bakhtiari sheep is low. Cholelithiasis can cause chronic inflammation of the gallbladder, but it is not likely to become clinically significant.