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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2012, Article ID 609597, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/609597
Research Article

Localisation of Abundant and Organ-Specific Genes Expressed in Rosa hybrida Leaves and Flower Buds by Direct In Situ RT-PCR

1Faculty of Natural Sciences, Institute for Ornamental and Woody Plant Science, University of Hannover, Herrenhauser Street 2, 30419 Hannover, Germany
2Department of Ornamental Plants, Faculty of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Nowoursynowska 166, 02-787 Warsaw, Poland

Received 28 October 2011; Accepted 20 December 2011

Academic Editors: Y. Shoyama, M. Simmonds, and B. Vyskot

Copyright © 2012 Agata Jedrzejuk et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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