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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 691545, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/691545
Research Article

Erratic Male Meiosis Resulting in 2𝑛 Pollen Grain Formation in a 4x Cytotype (2𝑛=28) of Ranunculus laetus Wall. ex Royle

Department of Botany, Punjabi University, Patiala 147 002, Punjab, India

Received 13 October 2011; Accepted 7 December 2011

Academic Editors: A. Kulharya and B. Vyskot

Copyright © 2012 Puneet Kumar and Vijay Kumar Singhal. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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