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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2012, Article ID 743926, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/743926
Research Article

Sensitivity of Beech Trees to Global Environmental Changes at Most North-Eastern Latitude of Their Occurrence in Europe

1Faculty of Forestry and Ecology, Aleksandras Stulginskis University, Akademija, 53362, Kaunas District, Lithuania
2Environmental Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, 02300 Vilnius, Lithuania

Received 31 October 2011; Accepted 29 December 2011

Academic Editors: A. W. Gertler and O. Hertel

Copyright © 2012 Algirdas Augustaitis et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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