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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2012, Article ID 748251, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/748251
Research Article

Kinetic Analysis for Macrocyclizations Involving Anionic Template at the Transition State

Departamento de Química Inorgánica y Orgánica, Universitat Jaume I, E12071 Castellón de la Plana, Spain

Received 21 October 2011; Accepted 19 December 2011

Academic Editors: D. Savoia and I. Shibata

Copyright © 2012 Vicente Martí-Centelles et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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