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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2012, Article ID 765909, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/765909
Research Article

Identification of Proteins with Potential Osteogenic Activity Present in the Water-Soluble Matrix Proteins from Crassostrea gigas Nacre Using a Proteomic Approach

Center of Marine Sciences, University of Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro, Portugal

Received 4 October 2011; Accepted 30 November 2011

Academic Editor: Eek Hoon Jho

Copyright © 2011 Daniel V. Oliveira et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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