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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2012, Article ID 769431, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/769431
Research Article

Aerobic Fitness Evaluation during Walking Tests Identifies the Maximal Lactate Steady State

1Catholic University of Brasília, 72022-900 Brasília, DF, Brazil
2Institute of Bioscience, Department of Physical Education, São Paulo State University, 13506-900 Rio Claro, SP, Brazil
3Department of Physical Education, State University of Londrina, 86051-990 Londrina, PR, Brazil

Received 11 October 2011; Accepted 29 November 2011

Academic Editor: Chad Chase

Copyright © 2012 Guilherme Morais Puga et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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