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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2012, Article ID 825028, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/825028
Research Article

Informal and Formal Supports for Former Child Soldiers in Northern Uganda

1Department of Orthopedagogics, Centre for Children in Vulnerable Situations, Ghent University, H. Dunantlaan 2, 9000 Gent, Belgium
2Heilbrunn Department of Population and Family Health, Program on Forced Migration and Health, Columbia University, 60 Haven Avenue, B-4, Suite 432, New York, NY 10032, USA
3Department of Experimental, Clinical, and Health Psychology, Ghent University, H. Dunantlaan 2, 9000 Gent, Belgium

Received 28 September 2012; Accepted 17 December 2012

Academic Editors: A. Fiorillo, L. Tait, and M. J. Zvolensky

Copyright © 2012 Sofie Vindevogel et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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