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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2012, Article ID 929067, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/929067
Clinical Study

Social Network Characteristics and Salivary Cortisol in Healthy Older People

1Department of Applied Social Studies, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
2SCOPE, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
3School of Social Sciences, Humanities and Languages, University of Westminster, London W1B 2UW, UK
4Center on Behavioral Health, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Received 22 October 2011; Accepted 29 November 2011

Academic Editors: M. Cesari and J. C. Rogers

Copyright © 2012 Julian C. L. Lai et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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