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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 218627, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/218627
Research Article

The Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Aspidosperma tomentosum (Apocynaceae)

1LaFI—Laboratório de Farmacologia e Imunidade, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, Maceió, AL, Brazil
2Laboratório de Pesquisa em Recursos Naturais, Instituto de Química e Biotecnologia, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, Maceió, AL, Brazil

Received 13 March 2013; Accepted 7 May 2013

Academic Editors: V. C. Filho and M. W. Jann

Copyright © 2013 Anansa Bezerra de Aquino et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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