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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2013, Article ID 241569, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/241569
Review Article

Effects of High Altitude on Sleep and Respiratory System and Theirs Adaptations

1Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Istanbul Medeniyet University, Faculty of Medicine, 34100 Istanbul, Turkey
2Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Acibadem University, Faculty of Medicine, 34742 Istanbul, Turkey
3Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Osmangazi University, Faculty of Medicine, 26020 Eskisehir, Turkey
4Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Celal Bayar University, Faculty of Medicine, 45010 Manisa, Turkey
5Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Dumlupinar University, Faculty of Medicine, 43100 Kutahya, Turkey
6Sisli Etfal Training and Research Hospital, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, 34371 Istanbul, Turkey

Received 6 January 2013; Accepted 20 March 2013

Academic Editors: I. Ozcan, K. M. Ozcan, and A. Selcuk

Copyright © 2013 Turhan San et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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