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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2013, Article ID 472431, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/472431
Review Article

Conducting an Agricultural Life Cycle Assessment: Challenges and Perspectives

Biological and Agricultural Engineering, North Carolina State University, Box 7625, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA

Received 1 September 2013; Accepted 3 October 2013

Academic Editors: W. Ma and P. Parolin

Copyright © 2013 Kevin R. Caffrey and Matthew W. Veal. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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