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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2013, Article ID 549091, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/549091
Review Article

Periprosthetic Joint Infections: Clinical and Bench Research

1Infectious Disease Department, Alpes-Leman Hospital, Route de Findrol, 74130 Contamines sur Arve, France
2Infectious Disease Department, Dron Hospital, Rue du President Coty, 59208 Tourcoing, France

Received 5 July 2013; Accepted 1 August 2013

Academic Editors: I. F. Hung and M. Zaccarelli

Copyright © 2013 Laurence Legout and Eric Senneville. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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