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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2013, Article ID 585467, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/585467
Review Article

Emerging Paradigms in Genomics-Based Crop Improvement

Indian Institute of Pulses Research (IIPR), Kanpur 208024, India

Received 17 August 2013; Accepted 16 September 2013

Academic Editors: W. L. Morris, J. L. Peirce, and F. Takeuchi

Copyright © 2013 Abhishek Bohra. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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