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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 135812, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/135812
Review Article

Rating and Ranking the Role of Bibliometrics and Webometrics in Nursing and Midwifery

1Johns Hopkins University (JHU), Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
2University of Technology, Sydney (UTS), Sydney, NSW 2007, Australia

Received 16 August 2013; Accepted 25 September 2013; Published 6 January 2014

Academic Editors: K. Finlayson, S. Read, and M. A. Rose

Copyright © 2014 Patricia M. Davidson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Bibliometrics are an essential aspect of measuring academic and organizational performance. Aim. This review seeks to describe methods for measuring bibliometrics, identify the strengths and limitations of methodologies, outline strategies for interpretation, summarise evaluation of nursing and midwifery performance, identify implications for metric of evaluation, and specify the implications for nursing and midwifery and implications of social networking for bibliometrics and measures of individual performance. Method. A review of electronic databases CINAHL, Medline, and Scopus was undertaken using search terms such as bibliometrics, nursing, and midwifery. The reference lists of retrieved articles and Internet sources and social media platforms were also examined. Results. A number of well-established, formal ways of assessment have been identified, including h- and c-indices. Changes in publication practices and the use of the Internet have challenged traditional metrics of influence. Moreover, measuring impact beyond citation metrics is an increasing focus, with social media representing newer ways of establishing performance and impact. Conclusions. Even though a number of measures exist, no single bibliometric measure is perfect. Therefore, multiple approaches to evaluation are recommended. However, bibliometric approaches should not be the only measures upon which academic and scholarly performance are evaluated.