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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014, Article ID 183457, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/183457
Research Article

Impacts of Groundwater Recharge from Rubber Dams on the Hydrogeological Environment in Luoyang Basin, China

1College of Environment and Resources, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot 010021, China
2School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074, China
3College of Life Sciences, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot 010021, China
4National Secondary Occupation School, Xilingol Vocational College, Xilinhot 026000, China

Received 9 June 2014; Revised 21 June 2014; Accepted 21 June 2014; Published 14 July 2014

Academic Editor: Hongbo Shao

Copyright © 2014 Shaogang Dong et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

In the rubber dam’s impact area, the groundwater total hardness (TH) has declined since 2000, ultimately dropping to 100–300 mg/L in 2012. pH levels have shown no obvious changes. NH4-N concentration in the groundwater remained stable from 2000 to 2006, but it increased from 2007 to 2012, with the largest increase up to 0.2 mg/L. NO3-N concentration in the groundwater generally declined in 2000–2006 and then increased from 2007; the largest increase was to 10 mg/L in 2012. Total dissolved solids (TDS) of the groundwater showed a general trend of decline from 2000 to 2009, but levels increased after 2010, especially along the south bank of the Luohe River where the largest increase recorded was approximately 100 mg/L. This study has shown that the increases in the concentrations of NH4-N and NO3-N were probably caused by changes in groundwater levels. Nitrates adsorbed by the silt clay of aeration zone appear to have entered the groundwater through physical and chemical reactions. TDS increased because of groundwater evaporation and some soluble ions entered the groundwater in the unsaturated zone. The distance of the contaminant to the surface of the aquifer became shorter due to the shallow depth of groundwater, resulting in the observed rise in pollutant concentrations more pronounced.