Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 275028, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/275028
Research Article

An Efficient In Vitro Plantlet Regeneration from Shoot Tip Cultures of Curculigo latifolia, a Medicinal Plant

1Islamic Azad University, Bushehr Branch, 7519619555 Bushehr, Iran
2Department of Crop Science, Faculty of Agriculture and Food Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia Bintulu Campus, Jalan Nyabau, 97008 Bintulu, Sarawak, Malaysia
3Department of Crop Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Universiti Putra Malaysia UPM, 43400 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia

Received 25 October 2013; Accepted 8 January 2014; Published 27 February 2014

Academic Editors: M. Penkowa and M. Talat

Copyright © 2014 Nahid Babaei et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. H. Yamashita, S. Theerasilp, T. Aiuchi, K. Nakaya, Y. Nakamura, and Y. Kurihara, “Purification and complete amino acid sequence of a new type of sweet protein with taste-modifying activity, curculin,” The Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol. 265, no. 26, pp. 15770–15775, 1990. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. S. Nakajo, T. Akabane, K. Nakaya, Y. Nakamura, and Y. Kurihara, “An enzyme immunoassay and immunoblot analysis for curculin, a new type of taste-modifying protein: cross-reactivity of curculin and miraculin to both antibodies,” Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, vol. 1118, no. 3, pp. 293–297, 1992. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. H. Yamashita, T. Akabane, and Y. Kurihara, “Activity and stability of a new sweet protein with taste-modifying action, curculin,” Chemical Senses, vol. 20, no. 2, pp. 239–243, 1995. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. Y. Kurihara and S. Nirasawa, “Sweet, antisweet and sweetness-inducing substances,” Trends in Food Science & Technology, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 37–42, 1994. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. A. Barre, E. J. M. van Damme, W. J. Peumans, and P. Rougé, “Curculin, a sweet-tasting and taste-modifying protein, is a non-functional mannose-binding lectin,” Plant Molecular Biology, vol. 33, no. 4, pp. 691–698, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. M. Suzuki, E. Kurimoto, S. Nirasawa et al., “Recombinant curculin heterodimer exhibits taste-modifying and sweet-tasting activities,” FEBS Letters, vol. 573, no. 1–3, pp. 135–138, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. A. Koizumi, K.-I. Nakajima, T. Asakura et al., “Taste-modifying sweet protein, neoculin, is received at human T1R3 amino terminal domain,” Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, vol. 358, no. 2, pp. 585–589, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. S. Okubo, T. Asakura, K. Okubo et al., “Neoculin, a taste-modifying sweet protein, accumulates in ripening fruits of cultivated Curculigo latifolia,” Journal of Plant Physiology, vol. 165, no. 18, pp. 1964–1969, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. M. F. Ismail, N. A. P. Abdullah, G. Saleh, and M. Ismail, “Anthesis and flower visitors in Curculigo latifolia Dryand (Hypoxidaceae),” Journal of Biology and Life Sciences, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 13–15, 2010. View at Google Scholar
  10. R. Kant, “Sweet proteins—potential replacement for artificial low calorie sweeteners,” Nutrition Journal, vol. 4, article 5, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. A. M. Fadlalla, W. Ratnam, and L. Y. Heng, “Genetic effects of arsenic and heavy metals pollutants on Curculigo latifolia (Lumbah),” Journal of Biological Sciences, vol. 7, no. 7, pp. 1155–1162, 2007. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. N. Babaei, N. A. P. Abdullah, G. Saleh, and T. L. Abdullah, “Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers and analysis of genetic variability in Curculigo latifolia Dryand,” Molecular Biology Reports, vol. 39, no. 11, pp. 9869–9877, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  13. B. B. Wala and Y. T. Jasrai, “Micropropagation of an endangered medicinal plant Curculigo orchioides Gaertn,” Plant Tissue Culture, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 13–19, 2003. View at Google Scholar
  14. N. A. P. Abdullah, G. B. Saleh, R. Shahari, and V. Lasimin, “Shoot and root formation on corms and rhizomes of Curculigo latifolia Dryand,” Journal of Agro Crop Science, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 1–5, 2010. View at Google Scholar
  15. S. S. Suri, S. Jain, and K. G. Ramawat, “Plantlet regeneration and bulbil formation in vitro from leaf and stem explants of Curculigo orchioides, an endangered medicinal plant,” Scientia Horticulturae, vol. 79, no. 1-2, pp. 127–134, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. T. D. Thomas, “High-frequency, direct bulblet induction from rhizome explants of Curculigo orchioides Gaertn., an endangered medicinal herb,” In Vitro Cellular & Developmental Biology, vol. 43, no. 5, pp. 442–448, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. S. V. Francis, S. K. Senapati, and G. R. Rout, “Rapid clonal propagation of Curculigo orchioides Gaertn., an endangered medicinal plant,” In Vitro Cellular & Developmental Biology, vol. 43, no. 2, pp. 140–143, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. T. D. Thomas and A. Jacob, “Direct somatic embryogenesis of Curculigo orchioides Gaertn., an endangered medicinal herb,” Journal of Plant Biotechnology, vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 193–197, 2004. View at Google Scholar
  19. C. L. Lim-Ho, “Tissue culture of Curculigo latifolia Dry. ex W.T. Ait. (Hypoxidaceae),” Gardens' Bulletin Singapore, vol. 34, no. 2, pp. 203–208, 1981. View at Google Scholar
  20. F. Arndt, R. Rusch, and H. Stilfried, “SN 49537, a new cotton defoliant,” Plant Physiology, vol. 57, no. 99, pp. 149–162, 1976. View at Google Scholar
  21. C. A. Huetteman and J. E. Preece, “Thidiazuron: a potent cytokinin for woody plant tissue culture,” Plant Cell, Tissue and Organ Culture, vol. 33, no. 2, pp. 105–119, 1993. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. G. Gyulai, J. Kiss, Z. Jekkel, E. Kiss, and L. E. Heszky, “A selective auxin and cytokinin bioassay based on root and shoot formation in vitro,” Journal of Plant Physiology, vol. 145, no. 3, pp. 379–382, 1995. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. M. C. Mok, D. W. S. Mok, D. J. Armstrong, K. Shudo, Y. Isogai, and T. Okamoto, “Cytokinin activity of N-phenyl-N-1, 2,3-thiadiazol-5-ylurea (thidiazuron),” Phytochemistry, vol. 21, no. 7, pp. 1509–1511, 1982. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. A. B. Yildirim and A. U. Turker, “In vitro adventitious shoot regeneration of the medicinal plant meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria (L.) Maxim),” In Vitro Cellular & Developmental Biology, vol. 45, no. 2, pp. 135–144, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. S. Uranbey, “Thidiazuron induced adventitious shoot regeneration in Hyoscyamus niger,” Biologia Plantarum, vol. 49, no. 3, pp. 427–430, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. V. Peddaboina, C. Thamidala, and S. Karampuri, “In vitro shoot multiplication and plant regeneration in four Capsicum species using thidiazuron,” Scientia Horticulturae, vol. 107, no. 2, pp. 117–122, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. C.-Y. Lu, “The use of thidiazuron in tissue culture,” In Vitro Cellular & Developmental Biology, vol. 29, no. 2, pp. 92–96, 1993. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. R. Yasodha, S. Kamala, S. P. A. Kumar, P. D. Kumar, and K. Kalaiarasi, “Effect of glucose on in vitro rooting of mature plants of Bambusa nutans,” Scientia Horticulturae, vol. 116, no. 1, pp. 113–116, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. J. Bonga and P. von Aderkas, In Vitro Culture of Trees, vol. 38 of Forestry Sciences, Springer, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 1992.
  30. C. M. Fogaça and A. G. Fett-Neto, “Role of auxin and its modulators in the adventitious rooting of Eucalyptus species differing in recalcitrance,” Plant Growth Regulation, vol. 45, no. 1, pp. 1–10, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. N. Babaei, N. A. P. Abdullah, G. Saleh, and T. L. Abdullah, “Control of contamination and explant browning in Curculigo latifolia in vitro cultures,” Journal of Medicinal Plants Research, vol. 7, no. 8, pp. 448–454, 2013. View at Google Scholar
  32. T. Murashige and F. Skoog, “A revised medium for rapid growth and bio assays with tobacco tissue cultures,” Physiologia Plantarum, vol. 15, no. 3, pp. 473–497, 1962. View at Google Scholar
  33. T. D. Thomas, “Pretreatment in thidiazuron improves the in vitro shoot induction from leaves in Curculigo orchioides Gaertn., an endangered medicinal plant,” Acta Physiologiae Plantarum, vol. 29, no. 5, pp. 455–461, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. L.-H. Zhu, X.-Q. Wu, H.-Y. Qu, J. Ji, and J.-R. Ye, “Micropropagation of Pinus massoniana and mycorrhiza formation in vitro,” Plant Cell, Tissue and Organ Culture, vol. 102, no. 1, pp. 121–128, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. D. Annapurna and T. S. Rathore, “Direct adventitious shoot induction and plant regeneration of Embelia ribes Burm F,” Plant Cell, Tissue and Organ Culture, vol. 101, no. 3, pp. 269–277, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. B. N. S. Murthy, S. J. Murch, and P. K. Saxena, “Thidiazuron: a potent regulator of in vitro plant morphogenesis,” In Vitro Cellular & Developmental Biology, vol. 34, no. 4, pp. 267–275, 1998. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. E. M. de Gyves, C. A. Sparks, A. F. Fieldsend, P. A. Lazzeri, and H. D. Jones, “High frequency of adventitious shoot regeneration from commercial cultivars of evening primrose (Oenothera spp.) using thidiazuron,” Annals of Applied Biology, vol. 138, no. 3, pp. 329–332, 2001. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  38. E. O. Sarihan, M. Khawar, and S. Özcan, “Prolific adventitious shoot regeneration from black psyllium (Plantago afra L.),” General and Applied Plant Physiology, vol. 31, no. 1-2, pp. 81–87, 2005. View at Google Scholar
  39. N. D. Singh, L. Sahoo, N. B. Sarin, and P. K. Jaiwal, “The effect of TDZ on organogenesis and somatic embryogenesis in pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan L. Millsp),” Plant Science, vol. 164, no. 3, pp. 341–347, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  40. S. Parveen and A. Shahzad, “TDZ-induced high frequency shoot regeneration in Cassia sophera Linn. via cotyledonary node explants,” Physiology and Molecular Biology of Plants, vol. 16, no. 2, pp. 201–206, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  41. S. Shirani, M. Sariah, W. Zakaria, and M. Maziah, “Scalp induction rate responses to cytokinins on proliferating shoot-tips of banana cultivars (Musa spp.),” American Journal of Agricultural and Biological Science, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 128–134, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  42. K. Sadik, P. R. Rubaihayo, M. J. S. Magambo, and M. Pillay, “Generation of cell suspensions of East African highland bananas through scalps,” African Journal of Biotechnology, vol. 6, no. 11, pp. 1352–1357, 2007. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  43. S. M. A. Elhory, M. A. Aziz, A. A. Rashid, and A. G. Yunus, “Prolific plant regeneration through organogenesis from scalps of Musa sp cv. Tanduk,” African Journal of Biotechnology, vol. 8, no. 22, pp. 6208–6213, 2009. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  44. N. J. Y. Sholi, A. Chaurasia, A. Agrawal, and N. B. Sarin, “ABA enhances plant regeneration of somatic embryos derived from cell suspension cultures of plantain cv. Spambia (Musa sp.),” Plant Cell, Tissue and Organ Culture, vol. 99, no. 2, pp. 133–140, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  45. R. Gill, T. Senaratna, and P. K. Saxena, “Thidiazuron-induced somatic embryogenesis enhances viability of hydrogel-encapsulated somatic embryos of geranium,” Journal of Plant Physiology, vol. 143, no. 6, pp. 726–729, 1994. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  46. P. Giridhar, V. Kumar, E. P. Indu, G. A. Ravishankar, and A. Chandrasekar, “Thidiazuron induced somatic embryogenesis in Coffea arabica L. and Coffea canephora P ex Fr,” Acta Botanica Croatica, vol. 63, no. 1, pp. 25–33, 2004. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  47. P. McSteen, “Auxin and monocot development,” Cold Spring Harbor perspectives in Biology, vol. 2, no. 3, Article ID a001479, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  48. R. A. Drew, J. A. McComb, and J. A. Considine, “Rhizogenesis and root growth of Carica papaya L. in vitro in relation to auxin sensitive phases and use of riboflavin,” Plant Cell, Tissue and Organ Culture, vol. 33, no. 1, pp. 1–7, 1993. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  49. X. Zhuang, J. Jiang, J. Li et al., “Over-expression of OsAGAP, an ARF-GAP, interferes with auxin influx, vesicle trafficking and root development,” The Plant Journal, vol. 48, no. 4, pp. 581–591, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus