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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014, Article ID 309673, 24 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/309673
Review Article

The Potential for Dams to Impact Lowland Meandering River Floodplain Geomorphology

1Department of Resource Management and Geography, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia
2eWater Cooperative Research Centre, Australia
3Department of Infrastructure Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia

Received 12 November 2013; Accepted 1 December 2013; Published 22 January 2014

Academic Editors: M. Bonini, K. Nemeth, and L. Tosi

Copyright © 2014 Philip M. Marren et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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