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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014, Article ID 407284, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/407284
Research Article

The Effect of Various Media and Hormones via Suspension Culture on Secondary Metabolic Activities of (Cape Jasmine) Gardenia jasminoides Ellis

1Institute of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
2Biology Division, Centre for Foundation Studies in Science Building, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Received 18 February 2014; Revised 7 April 2014; Accepted 14 April 2014; Published 21 May 2014

Academic Editor: João B. T. Rocha

Copyright © 2014 Reza Farzinebrahimi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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