Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014, Article ID 407832, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/407832
Research Article

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Cotton Field under Different Irrigation Methods and Fertilization Regimes in Arid Northwestern China

1College of Agriculture, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095, China
2State Key Laboratory of Desert and Oasis Ecology, Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xinjiang 830011, China

Received 19 February 2014; Revised 26 June 2014; Accepted 27 June 2014; Published 16 July 2014

Academic Editor: Antonio M. De Ron

Copyright © 2014 Jie Wu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. IPCC, Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 2007.
  2. A. F. Bouwman, L. J. M. Boumans, and N. H. Baffes, Global Estimates of Gaseous Emissions of NH3, NO and N2O from Agricultural Land, Food and Agriculture Organisation, Rome, Italy, 2001.
  3. FAOSTAT, 2002, http://faostat.fao.org/.
  4. C. Liu, X. Zheng, Z. Zhou et al., “Nitrous oxide and nitric oxide emissions from an irrigated cotton field in Northern China,” Plant and Soil, vol. 332, no. 1-2, pp. 123–134, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. T. Mahmood, R. Ali, J. Iqbal, and U. Robab, “Nitrous oxide emission from an irrigated cotton field under semiarid subtropical conditions,” Biology and Fertility of Soils, vol. 44, no. 5, pp. 773–781, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. C. Scheer, R. Wassmann, K. Kienzler, N. Ibragimov, and R. Eschanov, “Nitrous oxide emissions from fertilized, irrigated cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) in the Aral Sea Basin, Uzbekistan: influence of nitrogen applications and irrigation practices,” Soil Biology and Biochemistry, vol. 40, no. 2, pp. 290–301, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. J. Li, J. Zhang, and L. Ren, “Water and nitrogen distribution as affected by fertigation of ammonium nitrate from a point source,” Irrigation Science, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 19–30, 2003. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. C. M. Kallenbach, D. E. Rolston, and W. R. Horwath, “Cover cropping affects soil N2O and CO2 emissions differently depending on type of irrigation,” Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment, vol. 137, no. 3-4, pp. 251–260, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. L. Sánchez-Martín, A. Arce, A. Benito, L. Garcia-Torres, and A. Vallejo, “Influence of drip and furrow irrigation systems on nitrogen oxide emissions from a horticultural crop,” Soil Biology and Biochemistry, vol. 40, no. 7, pp. 1698–1706, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. L. Sanchez-Martín, A. Meijide, L. Garcia-Torres, and A. Vallejo, “Combination of drip irrigation and organic fertilizer for mitigating emissions of nitrogen oxides in semiarid climate,” Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment, vol. 137, no. 1-2, pp. 99–107, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. J. Lehmann, “Bio-energy in the black,” Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, vol. 5, no. 7, pp. 381–387, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. M. Fowles, “Black carbon sequestration as an alternative to bioenergy,” Biomass and Bioenergy, vol. 31, no. 6, pp. 426–432, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. M. Rondon, J. A. Ramirez, and J. Lehmann, “Charcoal additions reduce net emissions of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere,” in Proceedings of the 3rd USDA Symposium on Greenhouse Gases and Carbon Sequestration, p. 208, Baltimore, Md, USA, March 2005.
  14. Á. Aguilar-Chávez, M. Díaz-Rojas, M. del Rosario Cárdenas-Aquino, L. Dendooven, and M. Luna-Guido, “Greenhouse gas emissions from a wastewater sludge-amended soil cultivated with wheat (Triticum spp. L.) as affected by different application rates of charcoal,” Soil Biology and Biochemistry, vol. 52, pp. 90–95, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. S. Castaldi, M. Riondino, S. Baronti et al., “Impact of biochar application to a Mediterranean wheat crop on soil microbial activity and greenhouse gas fluxes,” Chemosphere, vol. 85, no. 9, pp. 1464–1471, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. B. P. Singh, B. J. Hatton, B. Singh, A. L. Cowie, and A. Kathuria, “Influence of biochars on nitrous oxide emission and nitrogen leaching from two contrasting soils,” Journal of Environmental Quality, vol. 39, no. 4, pp. 1224–1235, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. J. Wang, X. Pan, Y. Liu, X. Zhang, and Z. Xiong, “Effects of biochar amendment in two soils on greenhouse gas emissions and crop production,” Plant and Soil, vol. 360, no. 1-2, pp. 287–298, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. K. Karhu, T. Mattila, I. Bergström, and K. Regina, “Biochar addition to agricultural soil increased CH4 uptake and water holding capacity—results from a short-term pilot field study,” Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment, vol. 140, no. 1-2, pp. 309–313, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. C. Scheer, P. R. Grace, D. W. Rowlings, S. Kimber, and L. van Zwieten, “Effect of biochar amendment on the soil-atmosphere exchange of greenhouse gases from an intensive subtropical pasture in northern New South Wales, Australia,” Plant and Soil, vol. 345, no. 1, pp. 47–58, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. Z. Li, R. Zhang, X. Wang, J. Wang, C. Zhang, and C. Tian, “Carbon dioxide fluxes and concentrations in a cotton field in northwestern China: effects of plastic mulching and drip irrigation,” Pedosphere, vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 178–185, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. Q. Zhang, L. Yang, J. Wang, H. Luo, Y. Zhang, and W. Zhang, “Effects of different irrigation methods and fertilization measures on soil respiration and its component contribution in cotton field in arid region,” Scientia Agricultura Sinica, vol. 25, no. 12, pp. 2420–2430, 2012 (Chinese). View at Google Scholar
  22. Z. Li, R. Zhang, X. Wang, F. Chen, D. Lai, and C. Tian, “Effects of plastic film mulching with drip irrigation on N2O and CH4 emissions from cotton fields in arid land,” Journal of Agricultural Science, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  23. FAO/IAEA, Measurement of Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emission from Agriculture, A Joint Undertakong by the Food and Agriculture Organization of United Nations and International Atomic Energy Agency, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, Austria, 1992.
  24. Y. Huang, J. Jiang, L. Zong, Q. Zhou, R. L. Sass, and F. M. Fisher, “Influence of planting density and precipitation on N2O emission from a winter wheat field,” Environmental Science, vol. 22, no. 6, pp. 20–23, 2001 (Chinese). View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. G. C. Topp, J. L. Davis, and A. P. Annan, “Electromagnetic determination of soil water content: measurements in coaxial transmission lines,” Water Resources Research, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 574–582, 1980. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. R. Lu, Soil Agricultural Chemistry Analytical Method, China Agricultural Science and Technology Press, Beijing, China, 2000.
  27. L. Zhou, F. Li, S. Jin, and Y. Song, “How two ridges and the furrow mulched with plastic film affect soil water, soil temperature and yield of maize on the semiarid Loess Plateau of China,” Field Crops Research, vol. 113, no. 1, pp. 41–47, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. J. Clemens, M. P. Schillinger, H. Goldbach, and B. Huwe, “Spatial variability of N2O emissions and soil parameters of an arable silt loam—a field study,” Biology and Fertility of Soils, vol. 28, no. 4, pp. 403–406, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. K. Inubushi, M. A. Barahona, and K. Yamakawa, “Effects of salts and moisture content on N2O emission and nitrogen dynamics in Yellow soil and Andosol in model experiments,” Biology and Fertility of Soils, vol. 29, no. 4, pp. 401–407, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. B. J. Jørgensen and R. N. Jørgensen, “Field-scale and laboratory study of factors affecting N2O emissions from a rye stubble field on sandy loam soil,” Biology and Fertility of Soils, vol. 25, no. 4, pp. 366–371, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. A. R. Mosier and Z. Zhu, “Changes in patterns of fertilizer nitrogen use in Asia and its consequences for N2O emissions from agricultural systems,” Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems, vol. 57, no. 1, pp. 107–117, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. R. Ruser, H. Flessa, R. Schilling, F. Beese, and J. C. Munch, “Effect of crop-specific field management and N fertilization on N2O emissions from a fine-loamy soil,” Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems, vol. 59, no. 2, pp. 177–191, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. C. Song and J. Zhang, “Effects of soil moisture, temperature, and nitrogen fertilization on soil respiration and nitrous oxide emission during maize growth period in northeast China,” Acta Agriculturae Scandinavica B: Soil and Plant Science, vol. 59, no. 2, pp. 97–106, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. D. M. Linn and J. W. Doran, “Effect of water-filled pore space on carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide production in tilled and nontilled soils,” Soil Science Society of America Journal, vol. 48, no. 6, pp. 1267–1272, 1984. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. X. J. Liu, A. R. Mosier, A. D. Halvorson, C. A. Reule, and F. S. Zhang, “Dinitrogen and N2O emissions in arable soils: effect of tillage, N source and soil moisture,” Soil Biology and Biochemistry, vol. 39, no. 9, pp. 2362–2370, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. L. Sánchez-Martín, A. Vallejo, J. Dick, and U. M Skiba, “The influence of soluble carbon and fertilizer nitrogen on nitric oxide and nitrous oxide emissions from two contrasting agricultural soils,” Soil Biology and Biochemistry, vol. 40, no. 1, pp. 142–151, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. Z. Mu, S. D. Kimura, Y. Toma, and R. Hatano, “Nitrous oxide fluxes from upland soils in central Hokkaido, Japan,” Journal of Environmental Sciences, vol. 20, no. 11, pp. 1312–1322, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  38. B. Liang, J. Lehmann, D. Solomon et al., “Black carbon increases cation exchange capacity in soils,” Soil Science Society of America Journal, vol. 70, no. 5, pp. 1719–1730, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. P. Boeckx and O. Van Cleemput, “Estimates of N2O and CH4 fluxes from agricultural lands in various regions in Europe,” Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems, vol. 60, no. 1–3, pp. 35–47, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  40. J. A. MacDonald, U. Skiba, L. J. Sheppard et al., “The effect of nitrogen deposition and seasonal variability on methane oxidation and nitrous oxide emission rates in an upland spruce plantation and moorland,” Atmospheric Environment, vol. 31, no. 22, pp. 3693–3706, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  41. S. C. Whalen, “Influence of N and non-N salts on atmospheric methane oxidation by upland boreal forest and tundra soils,” Biology and Fertility of Soils, vol. 31, no. 3-4, pp. 279–287, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  42. J. P. Megonigal and A. B. Guenther, “Methane emissions from upland forest soils and vegetation,” Tree Physiology, vol. 28, no. 4, pp. 491–498, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  43. E. A. Davidson, F. Y. Ishida, and D. C. Nepstad, “Effects of an experimental drought on soil emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and nitric oxide in a moist tropical forest,” Global Change Biology, vol. 10, no. 5, pp. 718–730, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  44. F. L. Wang and J. R. Bettany, “Methane emission from Canadian prairie and forest soils under short term flooding conditions,” Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems, vol. 49, no. 1–3, pp. 197–202, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  45. R. Brumme and W. Borken, “Site variation in methane oxidation as affected by atmospheric deposition and type of temperate forest ecosystem,” Global Biogeochemical Cycles, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 493–501, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  46. A. P. S. Adamsen and G. M. King, “Methane consumption in temperate and subarctic forest soils: rates, vertical zonation, and responses to water and nitrogen,” Applied and Environmental Microbiology, vol. 59, no. 2, pp. 485–490, 1993. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  47. M. S. Castro, P. A. Steudler, J. M. Melillo, J. D. Aber, and R. D. Bowden, “Factors controlling atmospheric methane consumption by temperate forest soils,” Global Biogeochemical Cycles, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 1–10, 1995. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  48. B. C. Ball, K. A. Smith, L. Klemedtsson et al., “The influence of soil gas transport properties on methane oxidation in a selection of northern European soils,” Journal of Geophysical Research D, vol. 102, no. 19, pp. 23309–23317, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  49. K. A. Smith, T. Ball, F. Conen, K. E. Dobbie, J. Massheder, and A. Rey, “Exchange of greenhouse gases between soil and atmosphere: interactions of soil physical factors and biological processes,” European Journal of Soil Science, vol. 54, no. 4, pp. 779–791, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  50. H. Feng, G. Cheng, and L. An, “Microbial-mediated methane cycle in soils and global change: a review,” Journal of Glaciology and Geocryology, vol. 26, no. 4, pp. 411–419, 2006 (Chinese). View at Google Scholar
  51. Y. Yan, D. Wang, and J. Zheng, “Advances in effects of biochar on the soil N2O and CH4 emissions,” Chinese Agricultural Science Bulletin, vol. 29, no. 8, pp. 140–146, 2013 (Chinese). View at Google Scholar
  52. O. Cetin and L. Bilgel, “Effects of different irrigation methods on shedding and yield of cotton,” Agricultural Water Management, vol. 54, no. 1, pp. 1–15, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  53. N. Dağdelena, H. Başalb, E. Yılmaza, T. Gürbüza, and S. Akçaya, “Different drip irrigation regimes affect cotton yield, water use efficiency and fiber quality in western Turkey,” Agricultural Water Management, vol. 96, no. 1, pp. 110–120, 2009. View at Google Scholar
  54. N. Ibragimov, S. R. Evett, Y. Esanbekov, B. S. Kamilov, L. Mirzaev, and J. P. A. Lamers, “Water use efficiency of irrigated cotton in Uzbekistan under drip and furrow irrigation,” Agricultural Water Management, vol. 90, no. 1-2, pp. 112–120, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  55. C. R. Camp, P. J. Bauer, and P. G. Hunt, “Subsurface drip irrigation lateral spacing and management for cotton in the southeastern Coastal plain,” Transactions of the American Society of Agricultural Engineers, vol. 40, no. 4, pp. 993–999, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus