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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014, Article ID 412183, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/412183
Research Article

Effects of Different Vegetation Zones on CH4 and N2O Emissions in Coastal Wetlands: A Model Case Study

1College of Environment and Resources, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot 010021, China
2Key Laboratory of Coastal Zone Environmental Processes, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai 264003, China
3College of Life Sciences, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot 010021, China
4The Institute of Wetland Ecology, School of Life Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, China

Received 8 March 2014; Accepted 21 March 2014; Published 29 April 2014

Academic Editor: Xu Gang

Copyright © 2014 Yuhong Liu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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