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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014, Article ID 537826, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/537826
Review Article

Assessment of the GHG Reduction Potential from Energy Crops Using a Combined LCA and Biogeochemical Process Models: A Review

1Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 11A Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101, China
2University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
3Satellite Environmental Application Center, Ministry of Environmental Protection, Beijing 100094, China

Received 17 April 2014; Accepted 26 May 2014; Published 17 June 2014

Academic Editor: Yang-Chun Yong

Copyright © 2014 Dong Jiang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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