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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014, Article ID 584910, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/584910
Research Article

Genome Wide Analysis of Sex Difference in Gene Expression Profiles of Bone Formations Using sfx Mice and BXD RI Strains

1Department of Orthopedic Surgery and BME, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, 956 Court Avenue, Memphis, TN 38163, USA
2Mudanjiang Medical College, Tongxiang Road, Aimin District, Mudanjiang City, Heilongjiang 157001, China
3Department of Basic Research, Inner Mongolia Medical College, Inner Mongolia 010110, China
4Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163, USA

Received 24 April 2014; Revised 10 June 2014; Accepted 11 June 2014; Published 14 July 2014

Academic Editor: Yuji Mishina

Copyright © 2014 Yue Huang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The objective of this study is to identify sex differentially expressed genes in bone using a mouse model of spontaneous fracture, sfx, which lacks the gene for L-gulonolactone oxidase (Gulo), a key enzyme in the ascorbic acid (AA) synthesis pathway. We first identified the genes that are differentially expressed in the femur between female and male in sfx mice. We then analyzed the potential gene network among those differentially expressed genes with whole genome expression profiles generated using spleens of female and male mice of a total of 67 BXD (C57BL/6J X DBA/2J) recombinant inbred (RI) and other strains. Our result indicated that there was a sex difference in the whole genome profiles in sfx mice as measured by the proportion of up- and downregulated genes. Several genes in the pathway of bone development are differentially expressed between the male and female of sfx mice. Comparison of gene network of up- and downregulated bone relevant genes also suggests a sex difference.