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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 645737, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/645737
Research Article

Effects of Subchronic Exposure of Diclofenac on Growth, Histopathological Changes, and Oxidative Stress in Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

Department of Veterinary Public Health and Toxicology, Faculty of Veterinary Hygiene and Ecology, University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences Brno, Palackeho 1-3, 612 42 Brno, Czech Republic

Received 8 August 2013; Accepted 20 October 2013; Published 5 February 2014

Academic Editors: S. Morais, Y. S. Ok, and S. Polesello

Copyright © 2014 Eva Praskova et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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