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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 769732, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/769732
Research Article

The Effect of Water Stress on Some Morphological, Physiological, and Biochemical Characteristics and Bud Success on Apple and Quince Rootstocks

1Department of Horticulture, Faculty of Agriculture, Harran University, Sanliurfa, Turkey
2Department of Plant Protection, Faculty of Agriculture, Harran University, Sanliurfa, Turkey
3Department of Horticulture, Faculty of Agriculture, Ataturk University, Erzurum, Turkey
4Department of Biosystem Engineering, Faculty of Agriculture, Ordu University, Ordu, Turkey

Received 26 November 2013; Accepted 1 February 2014; Published 4 March 2014

Academic Editors: J. B. Alvarez and T. Takamizo

Copyright © 2014 Ibrahim Bolat et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The effects of different water stress (control, medium, and severe) on some morphological, physiological, and biochemical characteristics and bud success of M9 apple and MA quince rootstocks were determined. The results showed that water stress significantly affected most morphological, physiological, and biochemical characteristics as well as budding success on the both rootstocks. The increasing water stress decreased the relative shoot length, diameter, and plant total fresh and dry weights. Leaf relative water content and chlorophyll index decreased while electrolyte leakage increased with the increase of water stress in both rootstocks. An increase in water stress also resulted in reduction in budding success in Vista Bella/M9 (79.33% and 46.67%) and Santa Maria/MA (70.33% and 15.33%) combinations. However, the water stress in Santa Maria/MA was more prominent. The increase in water stress resulted in higher peroxidase activities as well as phenol contents in both rootstocks. Although catalase activity, anthocyanin, and proline contents increased with the impact of stress, this was not statistically significant. The results suggest that the impact of stress increased with the increase of water stress; therefore, growers should be careful when using M9 and MA rootstocks in both nursery and orchards where water scarcity is present.