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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014, Article ID 854391, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/854391
Review Article

Human Paraoxonase 1 as a Pharmacologic Agent: Limitations and Perspectives

Department of Biotechnology, National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research (NIPER), Sector 67, Sahibzada Ajit Singh Nagar, Punjab 160062, India

Received 11 May 2014; Revised 13 August 2014; Accepted 27 August 2014; Published 20 October 2014

Academic Editor: Srinivasa Reddy

Copyright © 2014 Priyanka Bajaj et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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