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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 863984, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/863984
Research Article

The Galloyl Catechins Contributing to Main Antioxidant Capacity of Tea Made from Camellia sinensis in China

1Key Laboratory of Forest Plant Ecology, Ministry of Education, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040, China
2College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193, China

Received 17 May 2014; Accepted 3 August 2014; Published 28 August 2014

Academic Editor: Tsutomu Hatano

Copyright © 2014 Chunjian Zhao et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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