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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014, Article ID 902987, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/902987
Research Article

RHBDL2 Is a Critical Membrane Protease for Anoikis Resistance in Human Malignant Epithelial Cells

1Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan
2Cardiovascular Research Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan
3Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Tzu Chi University, Hualien 970, Taiwan
4Biotechnology, Chia-Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Tainan 717, Taiwan
5Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan
6Center for Bioscience and Biotechnology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan

Received 10 February 2014; Revised 14 April 2014; Accepted 11 May 2014; Published 28 May 2014

Academic Editor: Luca Scorrano

Copyright © 2014 Tsung-Lin Cheng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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