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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2014, Article ID 916595, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/916595
Research Article

Comparative Analyses of Physiological Responses of Cynodon dactylon Accessions from Southwest China to Sulfur Dioxide Toxicity

1College of Landscape Architecture, Sichuan Agricultural University, No. 211 Huimin Road, Wenjiang, Sichuan 611130, China
2Business School, Sichuan Agricultural University, Dujiangyan, Sichuan 611830, China

Received 24 February 2014; Accepted 26 May 2014; Published 6 July 2014

Academic Editor: Mehmet Yakup Arica

Copyright © 2014 Xi Li et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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