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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2015, Article ID 318595, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/318595
Review Article

Vitamin D, Essential Minerals, and Toxic Elements: Exploring Interactions between Nutrients and Toxicants in Clinical Medicine

1Department of Family Medicine, University of Alberta, No. 301, 9509-156 Street, Edmonton, AB, Canada T5P 4J5
2Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, 2935-66 Street, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6K 4C1

Received 9 June 2015; Accepted 12 July 2015

Academic Editor: João Batista T. Da Rocha

Copyright © 2015 Gerry K. Schwalfenberg and Stephen J. Genuis. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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