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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2015, Article ID 373149, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/373149
Clinical Study

One-Year Follow-Up of the Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy for Patients’ Depression: A Randomized, Single-Blinded, Controlled Study

1Graduate Institute of Nursing, College of Nursing, Taipei Medical University, No. 250 Wu-Hsing Street, Taipei 11031, Taiwan
2Department of Nursing, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Sec. 2, No. 325 Chenggong Road, Taipei City 11490, Taiwan
3Department of Nursing, Taipei Medical University Shuang-Ho Hospital, No. 291 Zhongzheng Road, New Taipei City 23561, Taiwan
4Graduate Institute of Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, College of Oral Medicine, Taipei Medical University, No. 250 Wu-Hsing Street, Taipei 11031, Taiwan
5Research Center for Biomedical Devices and Prototyping Production, Taipei Medical University, No. 250 Wu-Hsing Street, Taipei 11031, Taiwan
6Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, No. 250 Wu-Hsing Street, Taipei 11031, Taiwan
7Department of Dentistry, Taipei Medical University Shuang-Ho Hospital, No. 291 Zhongzheng Road, New Taipei City 23561, Taiwan
8Psychiatric Research Center, Taipei Medical University Hospital, No. 250 Wu-Hsing Street, Taipei 11031, Taiwan

Received 29 August 2014; Accepted 20 October 2014

Academic Editor: Ru-Band Lu

Copyright © 2015 Kai-Jo Chiang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The aim of the study was to investigate the long-term (one year) effectiveness of a 12-session weekly cognitive behavior group therapy (CBGT) on patients with depression. This was a single-blind randomized controlled study with a 2-arm parallel group design. Eighty-one subjects were randomly assigned to 12 sessions intervention group (CBGT) or control group (usual outpatient psychiatric care group) and 62 completed the study. The primary outcome was depression measured with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD). The secondary outcomes were automatic thoughts measured by automatic thoughts questionnaire (ATQ). Both groups were evaluated at the pretest (before 2 weeks), posttest (after 12 therapy sessions), and short- (3 months), medium- (6 months), and long-term (12 months) follow-up. After receiving CBGT, the experimental group had a statistically significant reduction in the BDI-II from 40.30 at baseline to 17.82 points at session eight and to 10.17 points at postintervention . Similar effects were seen on the HRSD. ATQ significantly decreased at the 12th session, 6 months after sessions, and 1 year after the sessions ended . We concluded that CBGT is effective for reducing depression and continued to be effective at 1 year of follow-up.