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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2015, Article ID 623896, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/623896
Research Article

Brain Computer Interface on Track to Home

1Barcelona Digital Technology Center, C/Roc Boronat 117, 08018 Barcelona, Spain
2Graz University of Technology, Inffeldgasse 13/4. OG, 8010 Graz, Austria
3Institute of Psychology, University of Würzburg, Marcusstraße 9-11, 97070 Würzburg, Germany
4Faculty of life and Health Sciences, University of Ulster, Jordanstown BT370QB, UK
5Cedar Foundation, 31 Ulsterville Avenue, Belfast BT9 7AS, UK
6g.tec Guger Technologies OG, Sierningstrasse 14, 4521 Schiedlberg, Austria
7Telehealth Solutions, Building 6, Suite 7a, Croxley Green Business Park, Hatters Lane, Watford WD18 8YH, UK

Received 7 November 2014; Revised 26 March 2015; Accepted 19 April 2015

Academic Editor: Yusheng Liu

Copyright © 2015 Felip Miralles et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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