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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2015, Article ID 915359, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/915359
Research Article

Health Behaviors and Overweight in Nursing Home Employees: Contribution of Workplace Stressors and Implications for Worksite Health Promotion

1Department of Work Environment & Center for the Promotion of Health in the New England Workplace (CPH-NEW), University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA 01854, USA
2School of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, 33014 Tampere, Finland
3Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA

Received 10 October 2014; Accepted 13 March 2015

Academic Editor: Noortje Wiezer

Copyright © 2015 Helena Miranda et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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