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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 5798372, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5798372
Research Article

Role of Alexithymia, Anxiety, and Depression in Predicting Self-Efficacy in Academic Students

1Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Health Research Institute, Babol University of Medical Sciences, Babol, Iran
2Biostatistics & Epidemiology Department, Babol University of Medical Science, Babol, Iran

Correspondence should be addressed to Soraya Khafri; moc.oohay@irfahk

Received 22 September 2016; Revised 1 December 2016; Accepted 18 December 2016; Published 5 January 2017

Academic Editor: Cuneyt Evren

Copyright © 2017 Mahbobeh Faramarzi and Soraya Khafri. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objective. Little research is available on the predictive factors of self-efficacy in college students. The aim of the present study is to examine the role of alexithymia, anxiety, and depression in predicting self-efficacy in academic students. Design. In a cross-sectional study, a total of 133 students at Babol University of Medical Sciences (Medicine, Dentistry, and Paramedicine) participated in the study between 2014 and 2015. All participants completed the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), College Academic Self-Efficacy Scale (CASES), and 14 items on anxiety and depression derived from the 28 items of the General Health Questionnaire (28-GHQ). Results. Pearson correlation coefficients revealed negative significant relationships between alexithymia and the three subscales with student self-efficacy. There was no significant correlation between anxiety/depression symptoms and student self-efficacy. A backward multiple regression analysis revealed that alexithymia was a negative significant predictor of self-efficacy in academic students (, ). The prevalence of alexithymia was 21.8% in students. Multiple backward logistic analysis regression revealed that number of passed semesters, gender, mother’s education, father’s education, and doctoral level did not accurately predict alexithymia in college students. Conclusion. As alexithymia is prevalent in college students and affects self-efficacy and academic functioning, we suggest it should be routinely evaluated by mental physicians at universities.