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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 5798372, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5798372
Research Article

Role of Alexithymia, Anxiety, and Depression in Predicting Self-Efficacy in Academic Students

1Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Health Research Institute, Babol University of Medical Sciences, Babol, Iran
2Biostatistics & Epidemiology Department, Babol University of Medical Science, Babol, Iran

Correspondence should be addressed to Soraya Khafri; moc.oohay@irfahk

Received 22 September 2016; Revised 1 December 2016; Accepted 18 December 2016; Published 5 January 2017

Academic Editor: Cuneyt Evren

Copyright © 2017 Mahbobeh Faramarzi and Soraya Khafri. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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