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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2017, Article ID 7343928, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7343928
Review Article

Chemical Composition and Nutritive Benefits of Chicory (Cichorium intybus) as an Ideal Complementary and/or Alternative Livestock Feed Supplement

1Department of Agriculture, Faculty of Health and Environmental Sciences, Central University of Technology, Free State, Private Bag X20539, Bloemfontein 9300, South Africa
2Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Mangosuthu University of Technology, P.O. Box 12363, Jacobs, Durban, Umlazi, KwaZulu-Natal 4026, South Africa

Correspondence should be addressed to Matthew Chilaka Achilonu; ku.oc.oohay@unolihcacm

Received 21 August 2017; Accepted 19 November 2017; Published 13 December 2017

Academic Editor: Valdir Cechinel Filho

Copyright © 2017 Ifeoma Chinyelu Nwafor et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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