Table of Contents
Urban Studies Research
Volume 2014, Article ID 787261, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/787261
Research Article

From the City to the Suburbs: Characteristics of Suburban Neighborhoods Where Chicago Housing Choice Voucher Households Relocated

DePaul University, 14 East Jackson Boulevard, Suite 1600, Chicago, IL 60604, USA

Received 8 February 2014; Revised 6 May 2014; Accepted 20 May 2014; Published 16 June 2014

Academic Editor: Enda Murphy

Copyright © 2014 Adrienne M. Holloway. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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