Table of Contents
Urban Studies Research
Volume 2016, Article ID 5395379, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5395379
Research Article

Shrinking Regions in a Shrinking Country: The Geography of Population Decline in Lithuania 2001–2011

1OTB-Research for the Built Environment, Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 134, 2628 BL Delft, Netherlands
2Department of Human Geography and Demography, Lithuanian Social Research Centre, Goštauto 11, LT-01108 Vilnius, Lithuania
3Department of Geography & Sustainable Development, University of St Andrews, Irvine Building, North Street, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9AL, UK

Received 9 January 2016; Accepted 25 February 2016

Academic Editor: Jianfa Shen

Copyright © 2016 Rūta Ubarevičienė et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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