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Veterinary Medicine International
Volume 2012, Article ID 236205, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/236205
Review Article

Mycobacterium bovis: A Model Pathogen at the Interface of Livestock, Wildlife, and Humans

1Infectious Bacterial Diseases Research Unit, National Animal Disease Center, Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Ames, IA 50010, USA
2Instituto de Investigación en Recursos Cinegéticos (CSIC-UCLM-JCCM), Ronda de Toledo s/n, 13005 Ciudad Real, Spain
3School of Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, UCD, Dublin 4, Ireland

Received 6 February 2012; Accepted 11 April 2012

Academic Editor: Jesse M. Hostetter

Copyright © 2012 Mitchell V. Palmer et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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