Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Veterinary Medicine International
Volume 2012, Article ID 742478, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/742478
Research Article

DNA Typing of Mycobacterium bovis Isolates from Badgers (Meles meles) Culled from Areas in Ireland with Different Levels of Tuberculosis Prevalence

1Central Veterinary Laboratory, Department of Agriculture, Food, and the Marine, Backweston Campus, Celbridge, Co. Kildare, Ireland
2School of Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin (UCD), Dublin 4, Ireland

Received 20 December 2011; Revised 13 February 2012; Accepted 29 February 2012

Academic Editor: Jesse M. Hostetter

Copyright © 2012 Claire Furphy et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. L. A. Dolan, Badgers and Bovine Tuberculosis in Ireland: A Review, Royal Irish Academy, 1993.
  2. J. M. Griffin, D. H. Williams, G. E. Kelly et al., “The impact of badger removal on the control of tuberculosis in cattle herds in Ireland,” Preventive Veterinary Medicine, vol. 67, no. 4, pp. 237–266, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. D. Murphy, E. Gormley, E. Costello, D. O'Meara, and L. A. L. Corner, “The prevalence and distribution of Mycobacterium bovis infection in European badgers (Meles meles) as determined by enhanced post mortem examination and bacteriological culture,” Research in Veterinary Science, vol. 88, no. 1, pp. 1–5, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. D. Murphy, E. Gormley, D. M. Collins et al., “Tuberculosis in cattle herds are sentinels for Mycobacterium bovis infection in European badgers (Meles meles): the Irish greenfield study,” Veterinary Microbiology, vol. 151, no. 1-2, pp. 120–125, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. R. A. Skuce and S. D. Neill, “Molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium bovis: exploiting molecular data,” Tuberculosis, vol. 81, no. 1-2, pp. 169–175, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. N. Haddad, M. Masselot, and B. Durand, “Molecular differentiation of Mycobacterium bovis isolates. Review of main techniques and applications,” Research in Veterinary Science, vol. 76, no. 1, pp. 1–18, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. N. H. Smith, S. Berg, J. Dale et al., “European 1: a globally important clonal complex of Mycobacterium bovis,” Infection, Genetics and Evolution, vol. 11, no. 6, pp. 1340–1351, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  8. E. Costello, D. O'Grady, O. Flynn et al., “Study of restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and spoligotyping for epidemiological investigation of Mycobacterium bovis infection,” Journal of Clinical Microbiology, vol. 37, no. 10, pp. 3217–3222, 1999. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. F. J. Olea-Popelka, O. Flynn, E. Costello et al., “Spatial relationship between Mycobacterium bovis strains in cattle and badgers in four areas in Ireland,” Preventive Veterinary Medicine, vol. 71, no. 1-2, pp. 57–70, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. P. A. Durr, R. G. Hewinson, and R. S. Clifton-Hadley, “Molecular epidemiology of bovine tuberculosis. I. Mycobacterium bovis genotyping.,” OIE Revue Scientifique et Technique, vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 675–688, 2000. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. J. McLernon, E. Costello, O. Flynn, G. Madigan, and F. Ryan, “Evaluation of mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit-variable-number tandem-repeat analysis and spoligotyping for genotyping of Mycobacterium bovis isolates and a comparison with restriction fragment length polymorphism typing,” Journal of Clinical Microbiology, vol. 48, no. 12, pp. 4541–4545, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. J. Kamerbeek, L. Schouls, A. Kolk et al., “Simultaneous detection and strain differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis for diagnosis and epidemiology,” Journal of Clinical Microbiology, vol. 35, no. 4, pp. 907–914, 1997. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. B. Romero, A. Aranaz, J. Sandoval et al., “Persistence and molecular evolution of Mycobacterium bovis population from cattle and wildlife in Donana National Park revealed by genotype variation,” Veterinary Microbiology, vol. 132, no. 1-2, pp. 87–95, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. M. Richardson, N. M. Carroll, E. Engelke et al., “Multiple Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains in early cultures from patients in a high-incidence community setting,” Journal of Clinical Microbiology, vol. 40, no. 8, pp. 2750–2754, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. F. C. Quigley, E. Costello, O. Flynn et al., “Isolation of mycobacteria from lymph node lesions in deer,” Veterinary Record, vol. 141, no. 20, pp. 516–518, 1997. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. K. Dodd, “Tuberculosis in free-living deer,” Veterinary Record, vol. 115, no. 23, pp. 592–593, 1984. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. C. Gortazar, M. J. Torres, P. Acevedo et al., “Fine-tuning the space, time, and host distribution of mycobacteria in wildlife,” BMC Microbiology, vol. 11, no. 1, article 27, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. I. Aznar, G. McGrath, D. Murphy et al., “Trial design to estimate the effect of vaccination on tuberculosis incidence in badgers,” Veterinary Microbiology, vol. 151, no. 1-2, pp. 104–111, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. E. Gormley and L. A. L. Corner, “Control of tuberculosis in badgers by vaccination: where next?” Veterinary Journal, vol. 189, no. 3, pp. 239–241, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus