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Veterinary Medicine International
Volume 2016, Article ID 3086353, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3086353
Research Article

Circadian Rhythm and Stress Response in Droppings of Serinus canaria

1Unit of Basic and Applied Bioscience, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Teramo, Via Renato Balzarini 1, 64100 Teramo, Italy
2Via per Mosciano, No. 96, Giulianova, 64021 Teramo, Italy
3Via Villafranca No. 11, 72100 Brindisi, Italy

Received 3 October 2016; Accepted 9 November 2016

Academic Editor: Francesca Mancianti

Copyright © 2016 Maura Turriani et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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